Sunday Special – Park Güell, Barcelona


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View of Barcelona and a portion of Park Güell – Photo via Wikimedia Commons – Taken and owned  Marrovi (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5 mx (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/mx/deed.en)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Antoni Gaudi has his stamp on Barcelona. An architect and with a penchant for what is now referred to as Catalan Modernism.  His attention to detail and in his designs extended to use of wrought iron, ceramics, glass and more. One of his popular contributions is Park Güell, located on Carmel Hill. It was built during the years of 1900 – 1914. Its beginnings as a housing development failed and the area was then turned into a park in 1926. In 1984 it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site (classified as part of the works of Antoni Gaudi). Today people flock to see its buildings, statues, pillars and more. I do know that I will visit this place should I make my way to Barcelona. The curves, vibrant mosaics and bold structures are reminiscent of candies and fairy tales. I expect I will be taken with the wonder of the design.

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Terrace filled with onlookers – Photo via Wikimedia Commons – Taken and owned By es:Usuario:Rapomon [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

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Curved bench at Park Güell – Photo via Wikimedia Commons – Taken and owned By deror avi (Own work) [Attribution], via Wikimedia Commons

SUNDAY’S SPECIAL SPOT – LA SAGRADA FAMILIA


Today is the final installment of “Sunday’s Special Spot”. I hope you have enjoyed the snippets provided and that it has stirred up a longing to see the world yourself. As an old proverb rings true, It is better to see something once than to hear about it a thousand times, I am taking that to heart. Time to step forward on a new adventure and I hope that you find yours as well. 

It is fitting that this final post is of La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Spain – one of my stops on my European leg. This yet unfinished basilica was Antonio Gaudi’s life’s focus. He worked on it from 1883 (construction began a year prior) until his death in 1926. Taking on a mix of styles such as late Gothic and Art Nouveau, some have speculated that it may be completed in 2026 to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Gaudi’s passing. Others estimate both sooner and later time frames. Despite its completion it is unique and fascinating architecture.

Sagrada Familia facade

La Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain

Photo credit – Wikimedia Commons – Public Domain (as granted by Mok9 – own work)

Interior columns, La Sagrada Familia

Interior columns, La Sagrada Familia

Photo credit – Wikimedia Commons – Public Domain (as granted by user Hgoerz – own work)