More of Amazing Egypt!


I am currently Jordan. This trip has been so hectic that I am behind in posting photos but they will keep coming. So far the history of Egypt has amazed me. The condition of many places is astounding well considering they are thousands of years old. The government is proactive in restoring and maintaining their ancient treasures.

Here are some photos from the market & shops in Aswan, the felucca boat ride on the Nile River (which I swam in), Kom Ombo Temple, and the Temples of Karnak. More to come after.

Truly, ancient Egyptian monuments have set the bar high when it comes to historic sites & monuments.

*All photos taken and owned by Eeva Valiharju / Wanders the World

Aswan market

Aswan market spices

Traditional felucca boat that my tour group used

We had 2 feluccas – this was the other one

The crew sailing us along the Nile

Kom Ombo Temple dedicated to the Crocodile King

Detail. Kom Ombo Temple.

This was a spectacular temple. The height of the columns alone was impressive.

Mummified crocs in the adjoining museum

The Temples of Karnak can really make you feel small.

An exterior section of Karnak

Karnak’s breathtaking columns

Hieroglyphs

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Sunday Special – Aegadian Islands, Sicily (Italy)


I am intrigued by many islands in this world. Islands can be a fascinating microcosm of life and that often draws my attention. There a thousands of islands in the world of every size and shape. The largest being Greenland and the smallest….well, there seems to be a few claims so I’ll just leave it at that. Today we’ll look at a group of small islands off the coast of a larger island. The Aegadian (or Egadian) Islands lie in the Tyrrhenian Sea off Sicily’s northwest shores. The three main islands of Favignana, Levanzo, Marettimo and the the two small islands of Formica and Maraone total 37 sq km / 14 sq miles in size. Although not as well known as other Italian islands they do have a historic significance. Age-old cave paintings dating back to the neolithic and paleolithic periods can be found in Levanzo’s Grotta del Genovese. These islands also saw the end of the First Punic War after Romans defeated the Carthaginian fleet in 241 BCE in their very presence. Today the islands mainly attract Sicilians and some tourists looking for beaches, birding, scuba diving and snorkelling, hiking, and fishing. Easily accessible by ferry from Sicily’s city of Trapani or Marsala (Favignana only) you can day-trip or spend a few nights. One can even island hop via the ferry services. An interesting island adventure awaits.

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Levanzo coastline – Aegadian Islands, Sicily (Italy) – Photo credit: Robert Vassallo, Levanzo island – panoramioCC BY-SA 3.0

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Church interior on Favignana Island, Aegadian Islands – Photo credit: Tommie Hansen, Church at Favignana Island, Sicily (Italy) – panoramioCC BY 3.0

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The waters around Favignana, Aegadian Islands, Sicily – Photo credit: René Bongard, Crystal clear water at Favignana – panoramioCC BY-SA 3.0

 

Sunday Special – Sardinia, Italy


Note: I apologize for note posting the last couple of weeks. I’ve had some personal issues to deal with. Though I will continue on now.

Time for island life! Let’s head to the Mediterranean Sea to Sardinia. This autonomous island of Italy is the second largest island in the Med. The island has numerous languages spoken there and all of them share equal recognition.  The capital city is Cagliari which is also the largest city.  The main draws of this destination are the lily-white beaches offset by the bluest waters. Along with beach life comes water sports along the lines of windsurfing, boating, surfing, scuba diving – to name a few. Although these are the biggest tourist draws there is some more to this warm and balmy island.

Heading into the interior of the island will take you away from the tourist crowds to where some locals reside. The topography is rocky and hilly with some of the oldest rocks in Europe. Much of them are part of the Gennargentu Range. There is even a ski resort in the area and Gennargentu National Park.  The interior also is home to a number of ancient megalithic structures dating back to the Nuragic Civilization of the Bronze and Iron Ages. Appearing to be buildings, these Nuraghes are listed with the UNESCO World Heritage Site.

It would seem you have a bit of variety on this Mediterranean island. Perhaps I’ll have to make a trip out there one day soon.

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The clear and blue waters of La Pelosa Beach, Sardinia – Photo credit: goldpicasa, Stintino, La Pelosa beach – panoramio (1)CC BY 3.0

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One of Sardinia’s lush beaches – Photo credit: trevis_lu (Luca Giudicatti), Spiaggia rosa, isola di budelli, sardegnaCC BY-SA 2.0

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An ancient Nuraghe found on Sardinia, Italy – Photo credit: WikibiroGonnesa-Seruci02CC BY-SA 3.0

Sunday Special – Meteora Monasteries, Greece


On the mainland of Greece in the Plain of Thessaly are unique rock pillars that rise up from the ground. Composed of a blend of conglomerate and sandstone they were formed millions of years ago by the earth’s movements and eventual wear resulting in astonishing vertical pillars reaching for the heavens. This area is known as Meteora which means “suspended in the air”. Perhaps that is what the builders of the Eastern Orthodox monasteries were aiming for, to be closer to the heavens along with a place of quiet and isolation. The monks that originally dwelt here were master rock climbers, scaling the daunting cliff sides to make their way to the buildings they erected. Over time they used pulley and ladder systems to make their way up the pillars and to the the neighbouring monasteries. When the Turks invaded (or danger was imminent) the ladders and ropes were reigned in and helped to ensure the survival of those residing in the 24 complexes of the time. Today only six remain and are still in use. In 1988 they were named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Today visitors are welcome to explore the monasteries and neighbouring town of Kalambaka. Along with the area’s history it also draws people in with its natural beauty and hiking, mountain biking, and rock climbing options. 

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Meteora, Greece – Photo credit: LucT, Stefanos Monastery, Meteora – panoramioCC BY-SA 3.0

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Meteora Monasteries, Greece – Photo credit: Thanos KoliogiorgosMeteora monastery 2CC BY-SA 4.0